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20121001
20121031
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)
can ramp up development of affordable housing in san francisco. >> thank you. mr. everett? >> providing affordable housing is a central and extremely important issue. that being said, we also need to look at how we deal with public housing within the city and county of san francisco. i grew up in section 8 housing. i know what that is like. i grew up on food stamps, i know what that is like. we need to understand how we can end some of the cycles that we talk about on a day to day basis and the root causes of those cycles. the way to address those is to directly target the housing crisis in san francisco and directly target hud housing. we do that by providing vouchers to folks. with the vouchers you could take a family and moved them into mixed income units. i am a product of that. i am a product of a young person being able to wake up in the morning and see to my left a doctor and see to my right a professional person and think intuitively why not me too? that is the san francisco that will move forward in the future. >> thank you. the next several questions regard fisc
an arguably related question for miss breed, mr. davis and mr. everett. what steps should the city take to increase the supply of new housing units? >> i served on the san francisco redevelopment agency commission for five years. i watched as developers who developed luxury condominiums similar to the project of 8 washington where they are trying to develop luxury condominiums. they pay into an affordable housing fund. and that affordable housing doesn't always necessarily get built. and right now the city is backlogged over 6,000 affordable housing units and this is since i before i left redevelopment agency. and so i'm sure that it's increased since then. we can't keep paying into this affordable housing fund and not building the affordable housing. i think it's important for us to focus on making sure that we build those housing units and when developers come in and they want to build affordable housing, that we hold them accountable to building that affordable housing simultaneously to the development of the developments that they want to build as well. >> thank you. mr. davis? >>
substantially in the coming years. miss breed, mr. everett, and miss johnson, if the city needs to generate new revenue to balance its budget, what new or increased taxes or fees should it consider? çk w miss breed, mr. everett and mr. johnson. >> london breed. i think part of what i see is a lot of waste and i also see a lot of very high salaries. i think we need to start by making sure, for example, when not going to pay for bottled water and that saved the city millions of dollars. i think we need to start looking at things, like cutting the costs on the number of vehicles we use, gas and some of the basics in order to save revenue in that capacity. we also need to look at the salaries. i know that we, as members of the board of supervisors, that is a little bit more difficult, because we get into potentially micromanaging. but in terms of fees, there are a number of ways to look at new fees, but i do think that we need to manage what we have now in a responsible way before we start to open the door to new opportunities to increasing revenue for the city. >> thank you. mr. everett. >> wh
very much. the next question is for mr. everett, miss olague and miss selby. fiscal analysts say pension and health care costs for city workers are likely to raise considerably in the years ahead. the issue position survey asked whether police and firefighters, whose pension benefits are greater than other city workers should have to wor nearly all the candidates running for district 5 supervisor said yes. what other steps should the city take to make pension and health care benefits for city workers more sustainable? mr. everett, miss olague and miss selby? >> i have been engaged on this issue as a community service, i host a radio and tv program called "folk law for ordinary folk," it's a very tough one in the sense that workers at some point are essentially giving up higher salary and higher pay in exchange for those pension benefits. so to come back later on and essentially cut that out from under them, the question is one of fairness and of equity. that being said, as far as police and firefighters, obviously those are public safety areas and it's a little bit different i
to me. >> thanks. mr. everett? >> your question reads like a law school exam question, by the way. [ laughter ] >> it's not my question personally. it's the committee's question. thank you. >> with that being said, the issue here is -- the real issue here is the paying of the plaintiff's attorney fees. and what is going on here you are incentivizing attorneys to take these cases, which aren't really lucrative cases. so the incentive is the paying of the attorneys' fees. without that sort of incentive, in a sense, justice would never be done, because the city doesn't have enough resources to take on the cases. so nobody could take on the cases, and again, justice would never be served. >> thank you. this question is for miss breed, miss johnson and mr. resignato. >> a couple of years ago then mayor good gavin newsom -- i'm sorry-excuse me, i missed a question here. my apologies. okay. this yes is for mr. everett, miss olague and miss selby. this is where i want to be. >> okay. >> thank you. again for mr. everett, miss olague and my selby. over the years there have been var
. >> thank you. mr. everett. >> what we need to do is stop raising revenue off the backs of people who could afford it the least. if we're going to go out and give tax breaks to twitter, besides the reasoning associated with that, we can't at the same time say we increase your parking or the cost to ride muni and the direct and real impact that has on the lives of ordinary people that. is what my campaign is all about. it might seem like a small issue, parking fees, but by implication, those who can afford it the least, those are the ones without garages. the most important asset you have as a low-income individual is your automobile. i'm on the campaign trail on a daily basis and people lament and almost cry to me because their vehicle has been booted or towed and they cannot get to work. san francisco has to stop raising revenue off the backs of people who can afford it the least. >> thank you, miss johnson. >> if you look on the sheets that has all of our combined answers you will see that i'm one the few people who doesn't support a lot of new taxes. i have served on the sunshine task
and health care benefits for city workers more sustainable? mr. everett, miss olague and miss selby? >> i have been engaged on this issue as a community service, i host a radio and tv program called "folk law for ordinary folk," it's a very tough one in the sense that workers at some point are essentially giving up higher salary and higher pay in exchange for those pension benefits. so to come back later on and essentially cut that out from under them, the question is one of fairness and of equity. that being said, as far as police and firefighters, obviously those are public safety areas and it's a little bit different in the sense that we definitely need to protect those pensions in a different manner than we do others. as far as other ways to save, i would certainly look at capping pensions moving forward, so that they don't increase incrementally over time. i think we need to put a cap on that now before it starts to burgeon and get out of control. >> thank you. >> miss olague. >> i believe i was one of the individuals who answered no. i don't think we should balance the budget on
kind of also agree with what mr. everett just said. and we have deeper political/social issues to address. we come up with new laws with gang injunction and the idea of stop and frisk and we have laws on the books already, but what we need is that we need police presence. we need community programs and also we need new ideas. if you talk about the end of the park at stanon, what is going on there now, i have been talking in the campaign because i think what is interesting is the idea of haight street museum. it's been tried before, but the haight street is an historical area and a museum really changing the way that area is and activating that area. i keep putting that out there, because that is something that i would propose as supervisor. >> thank you. mr. davis? >> the sit/lie law is a perfect example of trying to address a symptom without curing the disease. we have massive inequitis in our society. that is apparent from the number of homeless people that we see on our streets in san francisco and it's a problem that is not just a san francisco problem. it's a problem tha
. and i would be open to considering other elections as well. but i think as mr. everett mentioned, at a minimum, i would consider supporting and allowing non-citizens to vote in either of those two. >> here i am different. i have two children in public school and i would love to see citizens and non-citizens engaged in the school, at the school level. i think that is great. and i think we should do everything possible to engage these people at the school level, get them involved in their school. i, you know, personally from the friends that have i, who are non-citizens, they haven't been clamoring to vote for the board of education and to me if you are a citizen you get to vote. if you are not a citizen, you don't get to vote. if it's easier to perhaps we need to look at how easy it is to become a citizen, but my experience is if you want parent to participate in their children's education, get them involved in their schools. i feel a little differently at the community college level, because at that time they are adults themselves, i'm assumingand that is more like the dream act
a time card to mr. everett? [ laughter ] >> go ahead. >> thank you. you know folk in some conversations it's better to have all of your cards on the table. no pun intended >> [ laughter ] that being said an article finally came out in the san francisco guardain that said we want to tax people out of their cars. fair play. once you have the argument in place, then we can actually talk about. it that is what this is about. the health benefits are such that folks should essentially be taxed out of their cars. i don't take that position. i think that it essentially breaks the backs of the working poor in this city and it's just another example of how progressive politics in this city are not really kind to the working poor, and in some instances, in many instances, people of color. that being said as far as the sunday parking meter thing, you know what? religion aside, least one day of the week it would be nice if san francisco city government was off the backs of everyday residents. [ applause ] >> i like that. thank you. >> all right. next question. san francisco's transportation inser
that and we need that. thank you. >> thank you, mr. everett. >> i'm the type the progressive who grieves believes that we're only as wealthy as the least among us. so means that in san francisco we can only go as far as the african-american young men and women who have been economically disadvantaged for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need to talk about how to feed the single mothers in those communities. we need comprehensive reforms to bring those disadvantaged communitis with us. we cannot provide those folks with jobs unless we reform our drug policies in san francisco, which essentially disadvantage and persecute young men of color who on a day to day basis are being subjected to the criminal justice system in a way that is not done by other members of our society. >> you have got another minute. [ laughter ] >> on a day to day basis what we're doing here in san francisco is we are disenfranchising folks and limiting their ability for future employment. once you have a conviction for
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)